History & Culture in Central Vietnam

The Central is a very important focal location of Vietnamese culture and history. This region holds the heavily pivotal role in the nation throughout Vietnam’s history. The remnants of the region’s long and often dramatic history provide visitors with an insight into the vicissitudes of the past, and make this one of the most fascinating parts of the country to visit.

The Central is a very important focal location of Vietnamese culture and history. This region holds the heavily pivotal role in the nation throughout Vietnam’s history. The remnants of the Central Vietnam’s long and often dramatic history provide visitors with an insight into the vicissitudes of the past, and make this one of the most fascinating parts of the country to visit.

Champa kingdom – The heartland of the ancient Champa Kingdom was in Central Vietnam and originally stretched from Hue to south of Nha Trang and later to Phan Rang (Binh Thuan). The Champa’s were Hindus during the period of My Son’s use as a temple site 92 A.D. until 1,400 A.D.  Far away 40 km from Hoi An by road, My Son was claimed the most important surviving Champa ruins in Vietnam by UNESCO.

 

At that time, Champa Kingdom was crowded with the commercial in Hoi An, the political in Tra Kieu, and the spiritual in My Son. Throughout  4 centuries until 19th century,  Hoi An was a major international trading port comparable to Macau and Melaka. The ancient town is the only surviving Vietnamese port which remains intact as it was more than 200 years ago until now.

The Champas were great seafarers (and pirates) who owned ships and traded extensively with China, India, Java and other countries. Another part of Cham’s culture, hemp was grown and clothed the Champa people.Today some small Champa communities around Nha Trang still grow hemp but just for themselves .

Affected by the wars, the last of Chams settlement was annexed by the Vietnamese in beginning of 19th centuries, some of them have to escaped to other countries like Cambodia, Thailand within the region.

The Cham culture is diverse and rich because of the combination of indigenous cultural (plains culture, maritime culture, and mountain culture) and foreign cultural also (Indian cultures and religions such as Buddhism; early Han Chinese influences; Islam). Nowadays,  the sculptures and architecture of Chams still survive at the Champa temples provide a wealth of information about Cham history, art, and construction techniques, through analysis and interpretation of architecture, styles, and inscriptions.

Hoi An is said to be the meeting place of several cultures, owned to its important role in the region’s maritime trade, which resulted to a wonderful diversity of Chinese, Japanese and Vietnamese architecture; but it is too shallow to be a sea port now. Hoi An lies at the coast as its colourful lights and yellow houses dot its wonderful winding roads so it was attractive destination for visitors.

Hue – known as is the last Vietnamese imperial capital which lasted until the end of the French colonial empire in 1945 and Emperor Bao Dai abdicated and a communist government was established in Hanoi in the North. During the Vietnam war, Hue located in the South Vietnam nearly border with the North Vietnam. Hue is one of the main cultural, religious and educational centers of Vietnam. Many  attractive places are along the riverside of the romantically called Huong River. Almost visitors are interested and so curious about Hue’s ritual royal music. This music was proclaimed by UNESCO as a Masterpiece of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity on December 1993.

Hue has integrated material and spiritual values, which became its own unique special Culture

 

The impressive imperial citadel and the tremendous imperial tombs along the perfume river are truly inspiring views.

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